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Thinning Hair Prevention & Treatment Options

Everyone loses hair. It is normal to lose about 50-100 hairs every day. If you see bald patches or lots of thinning, you may be experiencing hair loss. And today we shall talk about the thinning hair prevention and treatment options in detail.
Prevention
Most thinning hair problems are caused by genetics (male-pattern baldness and female-pattern baldness). This type of hair loss is not preventable. These tips may help you avoid preventable types of hair loss:
Avoid tight hairstyles, such as braids, buns or ponytails.
Avoid compulsively twisting, rubbing or pulling your hair.
Treat your hair gently when washing and brushing. A wide-toothed comb may help prevent pulling out hair.
Avoid harsh treatments such as hot rollers, curling irons, hot oil treatments and permanents.
Avoid medications and supplements that could cause hair loss.
Protect your hair from sunlight and other sources of ultraviolet light.
Stop smoking. Some studies show an association between smoking and baldness in men.
If you are being treated with chemotherapy, ask your doctor about a cooling cap. This cap can reduce your risk of losing hair during chemotherapy.
Treatment
Effective treatments for some types of hair loss are available. You might be able to reverse hair loss, or at least slow further thinning. With some conditions, such as patchy hair loss (alopecia areata), hair may regrow without treatment within a year.
Treatments for thinning hair include medications, surgery to promote hair growth and slow hair loss.
1.Medication
If your hair loss is caused by an underlying disease, treatment for that disease will be necessary. This may include drugs to reduce inflammation and suppress your immune system, such as prednisone. If a certain medication is causing the hair loss, your doctor may advise you to stop using it for at least three months.
Medications are available to treat pattern (hereditary) baldness. Options include:
Minoxidil (Rogaine). This is an over-the-counter (nonprescription) medication approved for men and women. It comes as a liquid or foam that you rub into your scalp daily. Wash your hands after application. At first it may cause you to shed hair as hair follicles. New hair may be shorter and thinner than previous hair. At least six months of treatment is required to prevent further hair loss and to start hair regrowth. You need to keep applying the medication to retain benefits.
Possible side effects include scalp irritation, unwanted hair growth on the adjacent skin of the face and hands, and rapid heart rate (tachycardia).
Finasteride (Propecia). This is a prescription drug approved for men. You take it daily as a pill. Many men taking finasteride experience a slowing of hair loss, and some may show some new hair growth. You need to keep taking it to retain benefits. Finasteride may not work as well for men over 60.
Rare side effects of finasteride include diminished sex drive and sexual function and an increased risk of prostate cancer. Women who are or may be pregnant need to avoid touching crushed or broken tablets.
Other medications. For men, the oral medication dutasteride is an option. For women, treatment may include oral contraceptives and spironolactone.
2.Hair transplant surgery
In the most common type of permanent hair loss, only the top of the head is affected. Hair transplant, or restoration surgery, can make the most of the hair you have left.
During a hair transplant procedure, a dermatologist or cosmetic surgeon removes tiny patches of skin, each containing one to several hairs, from the back or side of your scalp. Sometimes a larger strip of skin containing multiple hair groupings is taken. He or she then implants the hair follicle by follicle into the bald sections. Some doctors recommend using minoxidil after the transplant, to help minimize hair loss. And you may need more than one surgery to get the effect you want. Hereditary hair loss will eventually progress despite surgery.
Surgical procedures to treat baldness are expensive and can be painful. Possible risks include bleeding and scarring.
3.Laser therapy
The Food and Drug Administration has approved a low-level laser device as a treatment for hereditary hair loss in men and women. A few small studies have shown that it improves hair density. More studies are needed to show long-term effects.
When to see a dermatologist
If changing how you care for your hair does not help you see healthier hair, you may want to see a dermatologist. Your hair care may not be the root cause of your problem. Seeing a dermatologist is especially important if you are concerned about thinning hair or hair loss. Most causes can be stopped or treated. The sooner the problem is addressed, the better your results.